Iraq War Fiction

The good and the bad, and the in-between – an incomplete list of Iraq and Afghanistan War fiction, 2003 – 2009:

NOVELS / GRAPHIC NOVELS / PLAYS / VIDEO, FILMS, MOVIE

IRAQ WAR NOVELS:
Story of the Sand – Mark B. Pickering
Lost Boys – James Miller

Zubaida’s Window – Iqbal Al-Qazwini
The Ghost – Robert Harris
Like No Other – Robert Mercer Nairne
A Desert Called Peace – Tom Kratman
Operation Supergoose – William Hart
Hocus Potus – Malcolm MacPherson
The Sirens of Baghdad – Yasmina Khadra
Last One In – Nicholas Kulish
Homefront – Tony Christini
The Conquest of Oila – Tony Christini
Still the Monkey – Alivia C. Tagliaferri
The Scorpion’s Gate – Richard A. Clarke
The Human War – Noah Cicero
Homeland – Paul William Roberts
Outsourced – R. J. Hillhouse
Body of Lies – David Ignatius
The Contractor – Charles Holdefer
Bowl of Cherries – Millard Kaufman
Jasmine’s Tortoise – Corinne Souza
Ever After – Karen Kingsbury
Refresh, Refresh – Benjamin Percy
The L. P. – David Walks-As-Bear
Checkpoint – Nicholson Baker
A Medic in Iraq – Cole Bolchoz
The Chameleon’s Shadow – Minette Walters
Ammi: Letter To A Democratic Mother – Saeed Mirza
We Are Now Beginning Our Descent – James Meek
Mojave Winds – Mark Biskeborn
Sufi’s Ghost – Mark Biskeborn
No Space for Further Burials – Feryal Ali Gauhar
Queen of Hearts & Black Hands – Daniel Homan
Blind Fall – Christopher Rice
One of Us – Melissa Benn
Sunrise Over Fallujah – Walter Dean Myers
Concealed…Inside the Enemy – Barbara Kline
100 Days and 99 Nights – Alan Madison
A Thousand Veils – D. J. Murphy
You Leader Will Control Your Fire – Roy William Scranton
The Reluctant Fundamentalist – Mohsin Hamid
Linger – M. E. Kerr
Homefront – Kristen Tsetsi
Nothing to Lose – Lee Child
A Dangerous Age – Ellen Gilchrist
One Weekend a Month – Craig Trebilcock
No Time for Ribbons – Craig Trebilcock
The Third River – Nisreen Ghandourah
One September Morning – Rosalind Noonan
Wrongful Death – Robert Dugoni
When You Come Home – Nora Eisenberg
Castle – J. Robert Lennon

IRAQ WAR GRAPHIC NOVELS:
Army@Love – Rick Veitch
Shooting War – Lappe and Goldman
“Greendale” as graphic novelNeil Young & Joshua Dysart
Pride of Baghdad – Vaughan and Henrichon
Iraq: Operation Corporate Takeover – Wilson and O’Connor
DMZ – Brian Wood
To Afghanistan and Back – Ted Rall
The War Within – Gary Trudeau

IRAQ WAR PLAYS:
The Wolf – Sean Huze
1984 – Tim Robbins
Peace Mom – Dario Fo
Stuff Happens – David Hare
The Vertical Hour – David Hare
9 Parts of Desire – Heather Raffomore info
Flags – Jane Martin
Black Watch – Gregory Burke1 | 2
Ward 57 – Jessica Goldberg
March On, Dream Normal – Jeanette Scherrer
Betrayed – George Packer (additional)
Get Your War On – Shawn Sides / David Rees
One Shot, One Kill – Richard Vetere
Palace of the End – Judith Thompson
Beast – Michael Weller
In Conflict – Yvonne Latty/students
The Warrior – Jake Gilhooley
Only We Who Guard the Mystery Shall be Unhappy – Tony Kushner
Prayer For My Enemy – Craig Lucas
Iraq War, The Musical! – Paul Cross
The Eyes of Babylon – Jeff Key
Prophecy – Karen Malpede
Bring the King, Bring Him – Haider Munathar
Welcome Home, Jenny Sutter – Julie Marie Myatt
How Many Miles to Basra? – Colin Teevan
The Lonely Soldier Monologues – Helen Benedict
Old Glory – Brett Neveu
Baghdad Wedding – Hassan Abdulrazzak
The Women of… – Edgecombe, Harrison, Pollack, cast
Soldiers Circle – Russell Vandenbroucke

IRAQ WAR FICTION FILMS AND VIDEO:
Lions for Lambs
Over There
Valley of the Wolves Iraq
The Tiger and the Snow
Stop-Loss
The Situation
G.I. Jesus
24
A Mighty Heart
Home of the Brave
Grace is Gone
In the Valley of Elah
Rendition
Redacted
Homecoming
Embedded
Body of Lies
The Kingdom
Battle for HadithaWalsh review
War, Inc.
A Journal for Jordan
Against All Enemies
Brothers
Shooting War
Ahlaam
Badland
Charlie Wilson’s War
“Green Zone”
Day Zero
Turtles Can Fly
Harold and Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay
The Lucky Ones
Diary of the Dead
The Hurt Locker
“W”
Army Wives
Saving Jessica Lynch
Generation Kill
Taking Chance
In the Loop
The Messenger
Brothers

COMMENTARY (on Iraq war fiction):
Hollywood’s New Censors – John Pilger
Hollywood Goes to War – Andrew Gumbel
Hollywood Always at War – Response to “Hollywood Goes to War”- Christini / (Pilger)
Too Soon for Iraq Dramas?
Don’t Mention the War – Eddie Cockrell
Footnotes to the Conquest: Iraq War Novels and Movies
Antiwar Novels Are “Belligerent”? – Tony Christini
The Iraq war movie: Military hopes to shape genre – Julian E. Barnes

War No More: The Antiwar Impulse in American Literature, 1861-1914 byCynthia Wachtell

See also:

Cover for 'Fiction Gutted: The Establishment and the Novel'

Iraq War Documentary Films and Video:
EXTENSIVE LIST AT WIKIPEDIA

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War Inc. Reviewed

Joanne Laurier:
“Once War, Inc. makes its points about the outsourcing of war with all the attendant grotesqueries, it largely runs out of steam and a sloppy melodrama takes over.

“For all of its foibles, the film does tap into the deep feelings of large numbers of people, furious about American corporations that ruthlessly throw their weight around all over the world, and the demise of the US Constitution and open advocacy of torture by the political elite. It also testifies to the failings of the left-liberal milieu, which despite certain misgivings and criticisms, always finds itself running with the political pack of wolves who abet those they so despise. The pack we refer to is the Democratic Party and its apologists and hangers-on.

“In the end, War, Inc is a sometimes lacerating, but highly uneven, protest against the ever-expanding American war machine.”

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2008/jul2008/wari-j12.shtml

Also:

John Cusack: Bypassing the Corporate Media by Joshua Holland: “Cusack’s anti-war polemic, War, Inc., continues to defy expectations, despite the traditional media’s dismissive reception.”

And MovieMix

Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez interview John Cusack about War, Inc

From Democracy Now!:

JUAN GONZALEZ: Well, John Cusack, obviously you’re dealing with weighty and tragic situations, but you’ve chosen satire. Why the satire approach, did you feel was necessary?

JOHN CUSACK: Well, I think, you know, all satire or absurdism does is take current trends to the logical conclusion, you know, if you follow it a couple weeks or a couple years down the road. And some would argue, I think rightfully so, that we’re already there.

Review of John Cusack’s War, Inc. – by Larisa Alexandrovna

Alexandrovna:

War Inc. magnifies that which we already know and that which we are being forced to play along with…. Think for a moment of the real-life desert of the real that we live in. The Bush administration and their paid proxies, for example, attack those who disagree with them on the Iraq war as not supporting our soldiers. The term “irony” is not remotely strong enough to convey the horror of this rhetoric given that it is pouring out of the mouths of the very people who have lied to and exploited the troops, our troops. The same people – the Bush administration and their proxies – sent thousands of US soldiers to their death through willful lies and abandoned the broken rest to a hell-hole wasteland of medical neglect -have the arrogance to actually lecture us on supporting the troops. Worse still, the corporate press echoes these same talking points. Yet we see right through all of this, don’t we? It goes in circles and never stops. Is this not excruciatingly absurd? How does one find the logic of this chaos and maintain some semblance of sanity?

There is a scene in War Inc., which quite literally takes this perverted propaganda and puts it on stage in the form of a chorus-line of women whose legs have been amputated. Watching them kick up their metal prosthetic legs all the while smiling in thanks to the fictional defense contractor who has made their dance possible is bone-chilling. Yes, I laughed at the absurdity, but a sort of nervous laughter because crying long seized to relieve the tension. This scene captures perfectly that which we know about the twisted way in which the crimes of the Bush administration have actually hurt our troops and turns inside-out the talking points of the corporate press, directly aiming the sewage back against its origin.

Hollywood Movies and the US Military – article by Nick Turse

From “Torturing Iron Man: The Strange Reversals of a Pentagon Blockbuster” by Nick Turse:

“Liberal Hollywood” is a favorite whipping-boy of right-wingers who suppose the town and its signature industry are ever-at-work undermining the U.S. military. In reality, the military has been deeply involved with the film industry since the Silent Era. Today, however, the ad hoc arrangements of the past have been replaced by a full-scale one-stop shop, occupying a floor of a Los Angeles office building. There, the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, and the Department of Defense itself have established entertainment liaison offices to help ensure that Hollywood makes movies the military way.

 

What they have to trade, especially when it comes to blockbuster films, is access to high-tech, tax-payer funded, otherwise unavailable gear. What they get in return is usually the right to alter or shape scripts to suit their needs. If you want to see the fruits of this relationship in action, all you need to do is head down to your local multiplex. Chances are that Iron Man — the latest military-entertainment masterpiece — is playing on a couple of screens.

Footnotes to the Conquest: Iraq War Novels and Movies

The media is full of articles stating that Iraq war movies and films (the fiction features) have not done well at the box office, but compared to the relative lack of, say, Hurricane Katrina movies, or, say, the ongoing national slaughter of the impoverished by the impoverishers movies, the growing numbers of Iraq war movies, by their very existence alone, are doing extremely well.

Far more such movies have been made now than were remotely ever made about the Vietnam war at a comparable time. And far more people see most any of these movies than see most any such documentary. But it’s no cause for celebration, far from it, because these movies are very careful not to be too “antiwar,” too revealing of the basic illegality and immorality of the US conquest of Iraq.

Continue reading Footnotes to the Conquest: Iraq War Novels and Movies